Point and Click: Adding Music Videos to YouTube

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You've just had an epic jam-session, and you want to share it with the world. There's only one real option here: YouTube. Of course, the popular user-generated content site makes this easy for you to distribute your newest musical creation, but it's not always obvious how to get from “on your desktop” to “online.” Here's how to get the job done.

Set Up An Account If you don't have a YouTube account, it's easy to open one up. Fire up the YouTube page, and click “create account.” There's also an “upload” link you can click on. It'll take to the sign up screen if you click this before making an account. Fill in all of your information and Google will send you a confirmation email. Confirm your account creation and you're done.

Upload All The Things Once you're ready to upload, click the “upload” button on the top right of the screen. From here, it's pretty self-explanatory. You'll have to search your desktop for the video you want to upload and then upload it. Keep in mind that you’re limited to videos up to 15 minutes with a new YouTube account. When you’ve upgraded your account by verifying your mobile phone, you may upload a video of up to 11 hours and 128GB in size. If you need more than that, you have a very serious problem on your hands.

Upload From Mobile Uploading from a mobile device is also easy, especially on iPhone. Let's say you shot the video on your phone. Rather than transfer it to your computer, you can just edit it right there and then send it to YouTube. Much easier. Open the video on your smartphone or tablet's video app. Inside many of these apps, there's an option to upload right from the app. The only problem with uploading from a mobile device is that you may experience slower-than-normal upload times. This will be especially true on the cellular network or if you have a degraded service connection. Fortunately, you can get around this by uploading your videos when and where you have wi-fi.

Don't Forget Sharing Options OK, so you've got the video online. Now it's time to share it. Most people just pass the link around. But, guess what? When people watch your video on their mobile device, they have to worry about bandwidth – remember most cell service providers meter the data. So, you should also provide a download option for users, like YTD from http://youtubedownload.altervista.org/. These types of programs make it easy for users to grab your video from YouTube and share it locally on their Wi-Fi network or watch it when they don't have Internet access or just don't want to stream it on the cellular network. The program installs on the

These types of programs make it easy for users to grab your video from YouTube and share it locally on their Wi-Fi network or watch it when they don't have Internet access or just don't want to stream it on the cellular network. The program installs on the computer, and users only need to be able to copy and paste your YouTube link into the program and the converter will create a video file for local storage. Remember to respect intellectual property with video downloads and conversions. But, as long as the video is an original one made by you, you shouldn’t have any problems. Users can also convert videos they download by using the built-in file converter. All that users need to do is upload a file from their computer and select the file format. When converting files, users have the option of optimizing them for playback on Apple devices, Microsoft, burning to DVD, and a few other options.

Some Tips For A Better User Experience Make sure your users are getting good sound and video from your upload. Google publishes some tips for this, but basically, don't use edit lists and use MOOV atom at the front of the file so that users are able to play the video immediately (this is primarily for .mp4 files). If you use audio codecs, use stereo or stereo +5.1. For video codecs, choose H.264. It compresses the file, and yeah there's a little loss of quality there, but you can still get HD out of it, and this is what most users want. In fact, iTunes, and other popular streaming services, regularly use H.264 because it produces the best audio and visual quality of all lossy compression schemes. This is true even when you compare

Make sure your users are getting good sound and video from your upload. Google publishes some tips for this, but basically, don't use edit lists and use MOOV atom at the front of the file so that users are able to play the video immediately (this is primarily for .mp4 files). If you use audio codecs, use stereo or stereo +5.1. For video codecs, choose H.264. It compresses the file, and yeah there's a little loss of quality there, but you can still get HD out of it, and this is what most users want. In fact, iTunes, and other popular streaming services, regularly use H.264 because it produces the best audio and visual quality of all lossy compression schemes. This is true even when you compare highly compressed 1080p video to a less compressed 720p video. Whatever frame rate you record in, you should upload using the same. So, 24fps should be uploaded at 24fps. 30fps should be uploaded at 30fps, and so on. The 24fps scheme is good for that film look, so keep that in mind too. If you want to have a real cinematic “feel” to your video, use this. 30fps is OK, but it’s pretty standard. 60fps is considered “real motion.” Users will feel like they’re really there with you shooting the video. Oh, one more thing: YouTube uses a 16:9 aspect ratio. Make sure your video looks good with it.

Jocy Lordsmith is a video whiz. After years of creating and posting her own videos, she loves blogging about editing and sharing video work for professional and personal use.

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